Greenpeace Pirates? Russia Loses Another International Pr War

Russia, U.S. agree on how Syria should eliminate chemical arms – Putin

In the final tally, Klitschko landed 139 punches on Povetkin’s head to the Russian Warrior’s 31. The Ukrainian was declared winner by unanimous decision. Klitschko, looking as if he had hardly broken a sweat, tried to be gracious after his successful title defense was confirmed. “Alexander boxed to the last like a warrior, and I thank him for that,” he said into a microphone. “This is sports, and the stronger man wins.” Boos and whistles drowned out his words: To many in the audience, it had been much more than sports. Recriminations started immediately afterward. Nikolai Valuev, a former heavyweight champion turned pro-Putin parliament deputy, accused Klitschko of fighting dirty. Prominent Russian Orthodox clergyman Dimitri Pershin said Povetkin had lost because he had betrayed Christianity by showing too much interest in the ancient pagan gods of the Slavs. “Instead of tattooing runes on his body, he should have trained,” the Interfax news service quoted Pershin as saying. Some Russians were disheartened by the contrast between the pre-fight nationalist display and the fight itself. “Such a dense concentration of nationalism is advisable only when you’re fully confident of a victory,” former privatization minister Alfred Kokh wrote on Facebook. Many Ukrainians could not resist gloating at the Russian fighter’s powerlessness to stop their idol. Jokes filled social networks, with Ukrainians calling Povetkin “Chicken Kiev” and “Alexander the Hugger.” Perhaps Povetkin, who came unbeaten to the fight with Klitschko, could have acquitted himself better had it not been for the incredible political build-up. “What Alexander did in the ring was caused by extreme psychological pressure,” respected boxing commentator Vladimir Gendlin told TV Rain.

Russia protester gets forced psychiatric treatment

RT, the Kremlin-controlled television channel has aired numerous reports highly critical of fracking, a shale gas extraction technology developed in the U.S. that is spreading to Europe, threatening Gazproms export gas markets. But in todays highly integrated world, the Kremlins dismissive views of world public opinion seem quaintly out of date. Kremlin realpolitik geo-strategists say that good will and friendship do not count in relations between countries. That is just as well, because the Kremlin has successfully raised its ill will with its neighbors. In Paris, Greenpeace activists demonstrate near the Russian embassy. Last year, it was Pussy Riot. Last month, it was Gay Propaganda. The Putin administration sees little cost in international criticism. Photo: AP/Remy de la Mauviniere Since 2007, the Pew Research Center has annually surveyed people in 38 countries to determine their attitudes toward other countries. The median of respondents expressing positive attitudes towards Russia has gradually fallen, hitting 38 percent this year.

Secretary of State John Kerry (C) as Russia’s Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov listens during their meeting in Moscow, May 7, 2013. Credit: Reuters/Mikhail Klimentyev/RIA Novosti/Pool By Alexei Anishchuk NUSA DUA, Indonesia | Tue Oct 8, 2013 5:45pm BST NUSA DUA, Indonesia (Reuters) – Russia and the United States agree on how to eliminate chemical weapons in Syria, Russian President Vladimir Putin said on Tuesday after meeting U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry. “We have a common understanding of what needs to be done and how. I am very glad that President (Barack) Obama is occupying this position (on chemical arms),” Putin told reporters at the end of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation trade summit on the Indonesian island of Bali. International experts charged with starting the process of verifying and eliminating chemical weapons arrived in Syria earlier this month. Russia, Syria’s long-time ally and arms supplier, has offered to assist with the demolition process. Putin said he believed experts from the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) would be able to accomplish their goal of ridding Syria of its chemical arms within a year. “We and the Americans, the whole international community trust them,” he said. “If they are saying it is possible to do this (eliminate Syria’s chemical arms) in one year, then that’s the way it is.” The team of experts, supported by the United Nations, aim to oversee destruction of the Syria’s chemical weapons production and mixing equipment by November 1, and deal with all chemical weapons materials by the end of June 2014. Putin praised Syria for cooperation on the plan to destroy its chemical arsenal, a deal brokered by Moscow and Washington last month amid a possibility of U.S.

8, 2013 Russia protester gets forced psychiatric treatment Related View Larger Mikhail Kosenko stands in a defendants’ cage during his trial at a district court in Moscow, Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2013. Kosenko, one of 28 people arrested after clashes broke out between demonstrators and police at a protest on May, 6, 2012, the eve of President Vladimir Putins inauguration for a third term, has been convicted of calling for mass riots and sent for forced psychiatric treatment. (AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky) View Larger A police officer releases handcuffs from Mikhail Kosenko as he is placed in a defendants’ cage at a district court in Moscow, Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2013. Kosenko, one of 28 people arrested after clashes broke out between demonstrators and police at a protest on May, 6, 2012, the eve of President Vladimir Putins inauguration for a third term, has been convicted of calling for mass riots and sent for forced psychiatric treatment. (AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky) Sponsored Links The Associated Press MOSCOW A protester arrested after a mass anti-Kremlin demonstration last year was found guilty Tuesday of beating a policeman and sent for forced psychiatric treatment, a ruling human rights activists decried as a return to the Soviet practice of using punitive psychiatry against dissidents. Mikhail Kosenko was one of 28 people rounded up after clashes broke out between protesters and police on the eve of Vladimir Putin ‘s inauguration for a third term as Russia’s president. Kosenko was diagnosed in 2001 with mild schizophrenia, but his condition was controlled by medication and he had never shown any aggression, according to a statement from Human Rights Watch. The prosecution, however, said a psychiatric evaluation found that Kosenko was unable to realize the “public danger of his actions” due to a “chronic mental disorder.” Human Rights Watch not only objected to the use of forced psychiatric treatment but also questioned the charges brought against Kosenko. “The majority of the evidence, including from the police officer himself, indicates that Kosenko never touched him,” Tanya Lokshina, the rights group’s Russia program director, said in the statement.

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